Removing Skin Tags

What are Skin Tags?

Skin tags are small, raised growths of additional skin that are typically the same color as surrounding skin or darker. They are attached to the skin by a thin or thick “stalk” of skin. They can be smaller than the head of a pencil to as much as half an inch long. Skin tags are made up of blood vessels and collagen fiber surrounded by skin.

What Causes Skin Tags?

While the exact cause of skin tags is not known, their development seems to be related to friction on the skin or areas that develop heat and sweat. They often appear on the eyelids, neck, under the arms or breasts and in the groin area, in places where flesh folds over or where friction from clothing exists, such as along a bra line or waist band.

Some people are more likely to develop skin tags than others, including pregnant women, those who are overweight, the elderly and those with diabetes.

The average person will develop anywhere from one to 100 skin tags during their lifetime.

Are Skin Tags Dangerous?

Skin tags are a harmless and painless growth. Some people choose to have them removed for cosmetic reasons.

How are Skin Tags Treated?

There are several options for removing skin tags. Because skin tags usually possess no nerve endings, these treatments are painless to mildly uncomfortable.

  • Cauterization: Removal by the use of heat through electrolysis to burn the growth, causing it to fall off within a few days.
  • Cryosurgery: Removal by the use of liquid nitrogen to freeze the growth, causing it to fall off within a few days.
  • Ligation: Tying off the growth to limit blood supply, causing the growth to fall off.
  • Excision: Removal of the growth by scalpel or surgical scissors.

What are the Risks of Skin Tag Removal?

Skin tag removal is a safe and simple procedure. Skin tags may grow back in the same region after removal, but are easily treated.

For skin tag treatment, contact the Skin and Cancer Center of Scottsdale at (480) 596-1110 and schedule an appointment today.

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